October 1, 2022

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Everyone indulges on junk food of some kind every now and again, and to do so is considered a “healthy balance” by nutritional experts. But when unhealthy food begins to get eaten more regularly, that’s where the problems lie.
Joe Wicks revealed it doesn’t just have an affect on people’s weight, but it also controls their motivation among other aspects, too.
Speaking to Express.co.uk, he admitted he usually stays away from foods he knows will make him feel rubbish.
He said: “Some foods I see as treat, like ice-cream, fizzy drinks and chocolate.
“But the next day I feel really bloated and have a sore tummy, so I don’t really have them.”
He explained that despite working out and burning calories, ultimately if a person has eaten badly then it’ll effect them regardless.
“Even if you’re exercising and eating well, you can still feel really tired or run down,” he said.
“And it’s probably because of what you’ve eaten the night before.
“It does have a huge impact on our motivation, our body fat, how we feel and our energy levels.
READ MORE: Diet: Expert warns against common mistakeJoe Wicks shares why he avoids treats - it has a 'huge impact' on results
“That’s why you have to combine good food with exercise, you can’t really have one without the other.”
That’s why Joe’s latest cookbook, Feel Good Food, does exactly what it says on the cover – it’s all about food that makes people feel good in themselves.
Not only that, but as the cost of living continues to increase with people cutting back on their weekly supermarket shop, his super heathy recipes not only keep the weight off, but they keep money in people’s pockets as well.
The Body Coach, as he’s also known, explained that it is “a simple way of eating” where, “you’ll never go hungry”.
“You’re just giving your body the right energy source at the right time”, he said.
The book is full to the brim with tasty recipes that can boost people’s moods and help the lose weight.
Try these healthy recipes for quick and easy breakfast, lunch and dinner ideas that’ll help keep the pounds off, provide energy and motivation and leave people feeling ready to attack the day ahead.
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Banana and chocolate overnight oats
Breakfast is the first meal of the day and to many people, the most important.
Experts have suggested eating a high-protein breakfast is key to remaining full for the rest of the day and with overnight oats, they’re a time-saver.
Joe explained: “Just like cheese and wine, chocolate and banana were made for each other.
“This is a great way to use up bananas that are going black. As they over-ripen, they become softer and sweeter, both great things for the overall taste of this brekkie.”
Ingredients
For the banana and chocolate overnight oats
250ml almond milk
Two scoops (60g) vanilla protein powder
1One ripe banana, roughly chopped
One half tbsp cocoa powder (over 70 percent cocoa)
75g rolled oats
Grated dark chocolate, to serve
Method
Place all the ingredients apart from the rolled oats and dark chocolate in a blender and blitz until smooth.
Pour the mixture over the oats and stir well.
Leave to soak in a sealable container in the fridge for at least eight hours or overnight.
When you’re ready to eat, sprinkle the dark chocolate over the top.
READ MORE: Michael Mosley weight loss: Remove three foods to stay slimEating a high-protein breakfast is key to remaining fullYou can spice up a typical fish finger sandwichJoe shows you how to make roast beef at a faction of the price and caloriesFish finger sandwich
With this recipe, people can make them from scratch the night before to ensure there are no unhealthy elements, all in just 25 minutes.
And for those who like a little spice, he suggested adding ground spices such as paprika or cumin to the flour or breadcrumbs.
Ingredients
Four 130g boneless and skinless cod fillets
75g plain flour
Two eggs, beaten
200g fresh breadcrumbs
One tbsp coconut oil
One and a half tbsp zero-fat Greek yoghurt
Juice of one lemon
Two tbsp chopped parsley
One shallot, finely diced
One large sub rolls
Two gherkins, sliced thinly lengthways
Two handfuls of watercress, to serve
Method
Take each fillet of fish and cut it in half to make eight fingers.
Place the flour, beaten eggs and breadcrumbs into three separate bowls.
Pick up one fish finger and dip it into the flour, giving it a little shake to remove any excess.
Dip the finger into the egg and then finally into the breadcrumbs.
Repeat the process with all of the fish fingers.
It is likely that the fingers will need to be cooked in two batches, so melt half of the oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and when it is hot, gently lay the crumbed fish in the pan and fry for about two minutes on all four sides.
Drain the cooked fingers on a clean piece of kitchen roll and repeat the cooking process with the remaining crumbed fingers.
While the second batch of fish is cooking, mix together the yoghurt, lemon juice, parsley and shallot.
Spread the sauce thinly over the inside of the sub rolls.
When all the fish fingers are cooked, pile them into the sub rolls, top with the sliced gherkins and watercress.
Roast beef
Who doesn’t love a good Sunday roast? Now people can make their own at a faction of the price and a fraction of the calories with this simplified roast dinner.
Ingredients
1.5kg sirloin, at room temperature
Salt and pepper
Four carrots, roughly chopped
One large swede, roughly cubed
Two heads of cauliflower, florets only (about 650g)
215g mascarpone
One egg
Two spring onions, finely sliced
One tsp English mustard
40g cheddar, grated
25g parmesan, grated
20g butter
One bay leaf
Two sprigs of thyme
One tbsp plain flour
500ml good-quality beef stock
Method
Preheat the oven to 220°C (fan 200°C/gas mark 7) and season the beef with salt and pepper and place it onto a roasting tin.
Slide it into the oven and roast for 15 minutes before reducing the temperature to 175°C (fan 155°C/gas mark 4) and continuing to roast the beef for 25 minutes.
Remove it from the oven, wrap it tightly in tin foil and leave it to rest on a plate for at least 20 minutes. Do not throw away the fat and cooking juices from the tin.
While the beef is roasting, bring two large saucepans of water to the boil. Chuck the carrots and swede into one of the pans and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until they are totally tender.
Drop the cauliflower florets into the other pan and simmer for about eight minutes, or until the florets are just tender. Drain the florets in a sieve or colander and leave to steam dry.
Beat together the mascarpone, egg, spring onions and mustard along with a good pinch of salt and pepper.
Pile the cauliflower florets into an oven dish and scrape the mascarpone mixture over the top, spreading it out.
Then scatter the cheddar and parmesan over the top of the dish and slide the cauliflower into the oven and bake for 25 minutes, or until the mascarpone is bubbling and the cheese has browned.
When the swede and carrots are tender, thoroughly drain them in a sieve or colander and tip them back into the pan along with the butter. Add a bit of salt and a generous pinch of pepper and mash the lot together and keep warm until ready to serve.
Place the roasting tin over a low to medium heat and add the bay leaf and sprigs of thyme, sprinkle in the flour and stir to combine with the juices to form a smooth paste.
Cook the paste for about one minute then start gradually adding in the beef stock.
Keep stirring in the beef stock until it has all been incorporated, then bring to the boil and remove from the heat. Scatter with chopped parsley and serve up the roast beef dinner with some freshly steamed greens.
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